Translating Objects Directly

Use

You can call up individual objects directly in transaction SE63, without calling up a personal worklist.

Although you are generally advised to translate objects via a personal worklist, you may need to translate objects directly in the following situations:

·        The system in which the translation is required is not set up for translation.

·        You only need to correct a single object. If this is the case, it is quicker to access the object directly than to call up a personal worklist for several objects.

Prerequisites

To call up an object directly in transaction SE63, you need the following information:

·        Object type

·        Technical name

There are different ways of accessing objects directly for translation in transaction SE63:

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·        From the SE63 menu

·        Via the transport object

·        Via the technical object ID (shortcut)

·        Via a meta object ID (meta shortcut). These meta shortcuts are not available for all object types.

Each object type has its own entry screen, in which you need to specify the technical name of the object and the translation area from which it originates. The way the technical name is formed differs from one object type to another. The following conventions exist:

       1.      <Technical name without prefixes or suffixes>

This applies to most object types, such as data elements, report texts, and domains.

You want to access the data element SPRAS directly for translation. In transaction SE63, you enter the shortcut DTEL in the command field. On the next screen, you enter SPRAS as the object name.

       2.      <Technical name><blank characters><technical ID>

This applies to object types whose technical names are not unique. Examples include Screen Painter texts (screen number), message texts (message number), and cross-client tables including logical objects (table ID). The length of all keys is fixed, so blank characters are inserted between the technical name and the technical ID until the fixed key length has been reached. They are determined by performing a search using a placeholder.

You want to access message 111 in message class NA directly for translation. In transaction SE63, you enter the shortcut MESS in the command field. On the next screen, you enter NA*111 as the object name and choose F4.

       3.      <Client><technical name><blank characters><technical ID>

This applies to client-dependent tables. Once again, you are advised to use placeholders.

You want to access client-dependent system table T1111T in client 300 directly for translation. You log onto client 300, access transaction SE63, and enter the shortcut TADS in the command field. On the next screen, you enter *T1111T* and choose F4.

       4.      <Client><technical name>

This applies to other client-dependent objects, such as roles and forms.

You want to access the role SAP_TRANSLATOR in client 300 directly for translation. You log onto client 300, access transaction SE63, and enter the shortcut AGL in the command field. On the next screen, you enter 300SAP_Translator.

Meta Object Types

If object types have multiple R3TR transport objects in the transport environment, they are divided into subtypes in the translation environment to standardize the references from translation to the R3TR transport objects. This affects user interface texts, report texts, Screen Painter texts and headers, field selections, developer interface documentation, function titles, and function groups. In the translation environment, the R3TR transport objects are identified by the numbers in the object type shortcuts as follows:

1:   FUGR (function group)

2:   FUGS (function group with customer include: SAP part)

3:   FUGX (function group with customer include: customer part)

4:   PROG (program)

5:   TRAN (transaction)

6:   CNTY (context)

7:   LDBA (logical database)

8:   CLAS (classes)

RPT1 = text elements for function groups

SRT4 = Screen Painter texts for programs

The R3TR transport object for a translation object influences the technical name used to access the object directly. The following conventions apply:

FUGR:  Remove SAPL from the object name

FUGS:  Remove SAPL from the object name

FUGX:   Remove SAPL from the object name

PROG:  Leave SAP* in the object name

CNTX:   Remove CONTEXT_S from the object name

LDBA:   Remove SAPDB from the object name

CLAS:   Remove the equals signs (===) from the object name

The system contains the report SAPLORG. To translate the function group texts (RPT1) directly, access the report using the technical name ORG. To translate program texts (RPT4), enter SAPLORG as the report name.

The client-dependency and delivery class of a table are relevant to table transports. The object type of a table therefore shows you if the table is client-specific or not. In the case of client-specific tables, the third letter in the object type shortcut is D. In the case of cross-client tables, the letter is I. The last letter in the four-character table shortcut is the delivery class of the table.

You can directly access a client-specific system table using the shortcut TADS. A cross-client Customizing table, however, is accessed with the shortcut TAIC.

It is not always possible for translators to find out which R3TR transport object applies to a translation object, or which delivery class a table belongs to. For this reason, meta object types have been introduced to make it easier for translators to directly access subdivided object types. When these meta object types are used to access objects directly, the translation system finds the technically correct object type. The system has to search through all the subtypes, which means it takes longer to access objects with meta object types than with the technically correct shortcut. The following meta groupings exist:

Meta Object Type

Object Types

CUA (user interface texts)

CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CA5

CUAD (developer interface documentation)

CAD1, CAD2, CAD3, CAD4, CAD5

FSEL (field selection)

FEL1, FEL2, FEL3, FEL4

FUNC (function titles, parameters, exceptions)

FNC1, FNC2, FNC3

LIBT (function groups)

LBT1, LBT2, LBT3

REPT (text elements)

RPT1, RPT2, RPT3, RPT4, RPT6, RPT7, RPT8

SCRH (Screen Painter headers)

SRH1, SRH2, SRH3, SRH4, SRH8

SCRT (Screen Painter texts)

SRT1, SRT2, SRT3, SRT4, SRT8

SSCT (screen control)

SCT1, SCT2, SCT3, SCT4

TABL (tables)

TADA, TADC, TADW, TADE, TADG, TADS, TAIA, TAIC, TAIE, TAIG, TAIS, TAIW

Alternatively, you can translate the object as a transport object. For more information, see Translating Transport Objects.

For more information on all object types that you can translate in transaction SE63, see Object Type Shortcuts.

Procedure

Procedure 1: Accessing Objects via the Menu

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       1.      Call up transaction SE63.

       2.      Select the type of object to be translated. You have the following options:

Ў        Menu path

On the initial screen of SE63, expand the Translation menu option and then select the text type you want to translate (for example, ABAP Objects ® Short Texts.) For more information on text types, see Transaction SE63 under Features.

The system displays a dialog box listing all of the object types belonging to the text type you selected. Select the object type you want to translate from this list.

Ў        Text type shortcuts

As an alternative to the menu paths described above, you can enter a shortcut in the command field for the text type of the object you want to translate. The system displays a dialog box listing all of the object types belonging to the text type you selected. Select the object type you want to translate from this list.

The following text type shortcuts are available:

§         s for ABAP short texts

§         d for ABAP long texts (standard documentation)

§         o for other ABAP long texts

§         t for transport objects. For more information, see Translating Transport Objects.

§         x for non-ABAP interface texts (fragments)

§         y for non-ABAP interface texts (sentences)

§         z for non-ABAP texts with their own formatting

Ў        Object type shortcuts

The quickest way to access the object type you want to translate is by using its object type shortcut.

For example, enter DTEL in the command field if you want to translate a data element directly.

For a list of object type shortcuts, see Object Type Shortcuts.

After you have selected the object type you want to translate, the initial screen for this object type is displayed.

       3.      Enter the technical name of the object you want to translate. In this respect, note the information under Prerequisites.

If you want to translate an object whose full technical name consists of several individual components, enter the components of the technical name that you already know in the Object Name field. Separate one component from another with *.

Now choose F4. The system inserts the correct number of blank characters between the components of the technical name. If several objects meet the criteria you specified, a dialog box appears. Double-click the required object in the list. It is entered in the Object Name field.

If you use a meta object type to access an object, you only need to enter the technical name of the object. Then choose Edit. The system determines the full object name and the correct object type. If several objects satisfy the criteria you specified, a list of all possible objects appears. Select the required object.

       4.      Check that the default translation area, source language, and target language are all correct. These values are taken from your translation settings.

       5.      Choose Edit.

If you want to translate all objects of a specific type that belong to a specific collection (such as all of the data elements in collection ABC), enter the object type shortcut in the command field. Enter * as the object name, and choose Edit. A dialog box appears in which you enter the collection.

Result

The system calls up the object in the appropriate editor for the object type you are translating, such as the short text editor if you are translating ABAP short texts or non-ABAP interface texts that are fragments.

Now enter your translations, or adapt any existing translations, and save your work.

To return to transaction SE63, choose Back.

See below for some examples of how to translate objects directly.

Example 1

A developer needs you to translate the menu texts for a specific function group as soon as possible in a system that is not set up for translation. The function group is called /BILLING_UTILITIES.

Texts that appear in menus are called interface texts. The object type of interface texts for function groups is CA1.

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       1.      Call up transaction SE63.

       2.      Enter CA1 in the command field.

       3.      Enter /BILLING_UTILITIES in the Object Name field.

       4.      Check the source and target languages.

       5.      Choose Edit.

Example 2

A translation error has been discovered in screen 0100 of program ABC_TOOL_REPORT_1. The quickest way to correct it is by accessing the Screen Painter text directly in transaction SE63.

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       1.      Call up transaction SE63.

       2.      Enter the generic object type CUA in the command field.

       3.      Enter ABC_TOOL_REPORT_1 as the name of the object.

       4.      Check that the source and target languages are correct, and choose Edit.

The system selects object type SRT4 (Screen Painter texts for programs), and corrects the object name. The following information appears in the status bar: Correct object type: SRT4 -> Edit.

       5.      Choose Edit.